Mark Schramp

Position Title: Assistant Professor

Department: Biology

Office: Westerman 209

Phone: (913) 360-7524

Contact Mark Schramp

 


CLASSES | EDUCATION | RESEARCH | PUBLICATIONS | PRESENTATIONS | DISCOVERY DAY


Classes

 

  • Principles of Biology
  • General Biology I
  • Microbiology
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology


Education

 

Ph. D.

Molecular and Cell Biology

University of California, Berkeley

 

Bachelor of Science

Biology

Marquette University

 

Research Interests

 

We are studying how epithelial cells adopt specific characteristics that allow them to function within an organ system. Epithelial cells line the exterior of most organs and are therefore essential for development and normal homeostasis. During development of an organ, cells must respond to signals that direct them to alter their behavior (i.e. movement/migration, division and differentiation). How a cell integrates and responds to these signals is essential to form a functional organ. In our lab, we use the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to study how specific proteins regulate epithelial cell behavior during development. In particular, we are interested in how epithelial cells adhere to one another and to different protein matrices in their environment and how these connections are regulated during normal organogenesis. We have identified a number of important proteins (including the putative tumor suppressor protein, TES-1) that help epithelial cells move, form strong adhesions with other cells and their environment and adopt unique shapes that allow them to function within an organ. Our research can not only lead us to a deeper understanding of development, but can also shed light on how specific diseases arise. For instance, tumors that arise from epithelial cells constitute over 80% of the malignancies diagnosed each year. The ability of a tumor to form metastases, secondary tumors that enhance the lethality of the disease, depends on the same protein machinery that regulates normal cellular movement, migration and adhesion.

 

Publications

 

Mark Schramp, Lynch A and Hardin J (2012). TES-1 regulates cell adhesion during epithelial morphogenesis in C. elegans. (In preparation).

 

Mark Schramp and Jeff Hardin (2011). Tissue Remodeling: Making Way for Cellular Invaders. Current Biology, 21 (15):R585-7.
 
Mark Schramp, Hedman A, Li W, Tan X and Anderson R (2011). PIP kinases from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Subcell Biochem. 2012;58:25-59.
 
Thapa N, Mark Schramp, Choi S, Ling K and Anderson R (2010). PIPKIγi2 modulates the exocyst complex to regulate recruitment of integrin molecules in directionally migrating cells. Developmental Cell. 22(1):116-30
 
Mark Schramp, Thapa N, Heck J and Anderson R (2010). PIPKIγ regulates β-catenin transcriptional activity in mesenchymal-like cells downstream of growth factor receptor activation. Cancer Research, 15;71(4):1282-91.
 
Schill, N, Hedman A, Choi S, Mark Schramp and Anderson R (2010). PIPKIγi5 induces E-cadherin degradation by enhancing its trafficking to the lysosome. (In Preparation).
 
Mark Schramp, Olivia Ying*, T.Y. Kim and G. Steven Martin (2008). ERK5 Promotes Src-induced Podosome Formation by limiting Rho activation. Journal of Cell Biology, 181(7):1195-1210.
    
Jia L, Dienhart M, Schramp M, McCauley M, Hell K and Stuart RA   (2003). Yeast Oxa1 interacts with mitochondrial ribosomes: the importance of the C-terminal region of Oxa1. EMBO J. 22 (24): 6438-47.

 

Abstracts / Presentations

 

Mark W. Schramp, Lynch A and Hardin J (2011). TES-1 mediates epithelial morphogenesis.
18th International C. elegans Meeting. UCLA. Poster Presentation.
 
Mark Schramp, Lim PY, Gardner J, Yu J. Engaging Microbiology Students in a Lesson on Human-Microbial Symbioses. Teaching and Learning Symposium. University of Wisconsin. Poster Presentation.
 
Mark Schramp, Thapa N, Heck J, Turbin D, Huntsman D and Anderson R (2010). PIPKIγ regulates β-catenin transcriptional activity in mesenchymal-like cells downstream of growth factor receptor activation. Signal Transduction Research Training Symposium. University of Wisconsin. Poster Presentation.
 
Mark Schramp, Ying O* and Martin GS (2008). ERK5 Promotes Src-induced Podosome Formation by limiting Rho activation. American Association for Cancer Research: Cytoskeleton Signaling in Cancer. Poster Presentation
 
Mark Schramp, Olivia Ying* and G. Steven Martin (2007). ERK5 Activity is Required for Src-induced Podosome formation. Mechanisms and Models of Cancer. Salk Institute. Poster Presentation.
 
* Denotes mentored undergraduate

 

Discovery Day Projects

 

Expression pattern and sub-cellular localization of TES-1 and UNC-34 during epithelial morphogenesis - Kevin Amthor, Nick Loughman

Effects of TES-1 and UNC-34 proteins on the Behavior of Epithelial Cells - Rachel Foguth

 

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